[First] Videos

2018-05-16 – Farm Debt Mediation Bill – First Reading – Video 9

Kieran McAnulty

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https://amara.org/v/i4xU/

2018-05-16 – Farm Debt Mediation Bill – First Reading – Video 1

Mark Patterson

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https://amara.org/v/i4pK/

2018-05-16 – Farm Debt Mediation Bill – First Reading – Video 10

Hamish Walker

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https://amara.org/v/i4xT/

2018-05-16 – Farm Debt Mediation Bill – First Reading – Video 4

Barbara Kuriger

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https://amara.org/v/i4pH/

New York Times, Wall Street Journal & USA Today Bestselling Series. Seven books in total. This edition contains the first three:  Debt Inheritance “I own you. I have the piece of paper to prove it. It’s undeniable and unbreakable. You belong to me until you’ve paid off your debts.”  Nila Weaver’s family is indebted. Being the first born daughter, her life is forfeit to the first born son of the Hawks to pay for sins of ancestors past. The dark ages might have come and gone, but debts never leave. She has no choice in the matter. First Debt: “You say I’ll never own you. If I win–you willingly give me that right. You sign not only the debt agreement, but another–one that makes me your master until your last breath is taken. You do that, and I’ll give you this.”Nila Weaver’s family is indebted. Stolen, taken, and bound not by monsters but by an agreement written over six hundred years ago, she has no way out. Second Debt: “I tried to play a game. I tried to wield deceit as perfectly as the Hawks. But when I thought I was winning, I wasn’t. Jethro isn’t what he seems–he’s the master of duplicity. However, I refuse to let him annihilate me further.” Nila Weaver has grown from naïve seamstress to full-blown fighter. Every humdrum object is her arsenal, and sex…sex is her greatest weapon of all.

Now in audio, the updated and expanded edition: David Graeber’s “fresh…fascinating…thought-provoking…and exceedingly timely” (Financial Times) history of debt.

Here, anthropologist David Graeber presents a stunning reversal of conventional wisdom: He shows that before there was money, there was debt. For more than 5,000 years, since the beginnings of the first agrarian empires, humans have used elaborate credit systems to buy and sell goods – that is, long before the invention of coins or cash. It is in this era, Graeber argues, that we also first encounter a society divided into debtors and creditors.

Graeber shows that arguments about debt and debt forgiveness have been at the center of political debates from Italy to China, as well as sparking innumerable insurrections. He also brilliantly demonstrates that the language of the ancient works of law and religion (words like “guilt”, “sin”, and “redemption”) derive in large part from ancient debates about debt, and shape even our most basic ideas of right and wrong. We are still fighting these battles today without knowing it.

[Read by Grover Gardner]

David Graeber’s ”fresh . . . fascinating . . . . thought-provoking . . . and exceedingly timely” — (Financial Times) history of debt.

Anthropologist David Graeber presents a stunning reversal of conventional wisdom: before there was money, there was debt. For more than five thousand years, since the beginnings of the first agrarian empires, humans have used elaborate credit systems to buy and sell goods — that is, long before the invention of coins or cash. It is in this era, Graeber argues, that we also first encounter a society divided into debtors and creditors.

Graeber shows that arguments about debt and debt forgiveness have been at the center of political debates from Italy to China, as well as sparking innumerable insurrections. He also brilliantly demonstrates that the language of the ancient works of law and religion — words like ”guilt,’ ”sin,” and ”redemption” — derive in large part from ancient debates about debt and shape even our most basic ideas of right and wrong. We are still fighting these battles today without knowing it.

Debt: The First 5,000 Years is a fascinating chronicle of this little known history — as well as how it has defined human history and what it means for the credit crisis of the present day and the future of our economy.

The second book in the New York Times Bestselling Dark Romance Series. “You say I’ll never own you. If I win—you willingly give me that right. You sign not only the debt agreement, but another—one that makes me your master until your last breath is taken. You do that, and I’ll give you this.” Nila Weaver’s family is indebted. Stolen, taken, and bound not by monsters but by an agreement written over six hundred years ago, she has no way out. She belongs to Jethro as much as she denies it. Jethro Hawk’s patience is running out. His inheritance gift tests, challenges, and surprises him—and not in good ways. He hasn’t leashed her but he thinks he might’ve found a way to bind her forever. Debts are mounting. Payment waiting. For release date alerts please sign up to: http://eepurl.com/120b5

Now in paperback, the updated and expanded edition : David Graeber’s “fresh .?.?. fascinating .?.?. thought-provoking .?.?. and exceedingly timely” (Financial Times) history of debt
 
Here anthropologist David Graeber presents a stunning reversal of conventional wisdom: he shows that before there was money, there was debt. For more than 5,000 years, since the beginnings of the first agrarian empires, humans have used elaborate credit systems to buy and sell goods—that is, long before the invention of coins or cash. It is in this era, Graeber argues, that we also first encounter a society divided into debtors and creditors.

Graeber shows that arguments about debt and debt forgiveness have been at the center of political debates from Italy to China, as well as sparking innumerable insurrections. He also brilliantly demonstrates that the language of the ancient works of law and religion (words like “guilt,” “sin,” and “redemption”) derive in large part from ancient debates about debt, and shape even our most basic ideas of right and wrong. We are still fighting these battles today without knowing it.